Friday, June 12, 2009

When To Get Out

Layoffs, lack of jobs, pay cuts, "deferred" hiring dates.

At some point lawyers, law students need to realize that the landscape has changed, maybe not forever, but for the near forever.

The concept of "when will it come back" is a pipe dream. The law business got too big, got too inaccessible for people, even people with money, and lots of it.

It's time to realize that if you went into law for the wrong reasons, you need to get out.

Clients are out there, but they know. They know that lawyers are starving, in need of work, and unfortunately some lawyers are in suce dire straits that they will do anything, for any amount, even if they have no idea what they are doing.

It's time to ask the hard questions.

Did you go to law school for the BigLaw job and $150,000 starting salary?

Are you looking for "a job to help pay off law school loans?"

What are you looking for?

Things aren't getting better anytime soon. In fact, they will get worse. If you are not a "necessity" in the legal field, you've got a problem.

Money can be made in different ways. If the goal is money, it's time to consider something else. There are too many lawyers looking for too few dollars.

Lawyers are hanging on for dear life in this economy. Bad lawyers are making things worse by taking cases they have no business taking, all because they can't imagine another way to make money.

The entitlement aspect of young law graduates of "I spent $100,000 on a law school education and I want my damn $100,000 salary," is laughable in this economy.

The flushing out of the legal field is a good thing. There's too many in it for the wrong reasons.

Are you one of them?

Maybe it's time.

Located in Miami, Florida, Brian Tannebaum practices Bar Admission and Discipline and Criminal Defense. Read his free ebook The Truth About Hiring A Criminal Defense Lawyer. Please visit www.tannebaumweiss.com

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1 comment:

Houston DWI Attorney Paul B. Kennedy, said...

Amen. There's a reason the law has always been referred to as a "profession" and not a job.